Consumers Should Not Trust Companies: Snowden

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The next generation of Internet businesses, which will outcompete everyone else, are the ones that are designed that you do not trust the services that are intermediating your communications, whistleblower Edward Snowden said in a telecast keynote interview at Web Summit in Lisbon, Portugal.

While Snowden admits this sounds odd, he points out that in the context of information security, “trust is considered a vulnerability.” Continue reading

Many CMOs That Left This Year Won’t be Replaced

Screen Shot 2019-10-25 at 1.12.41 PMNationwide CMO Terrance Williams has announced that he will leave his post next month, after four years in the role.

Williams, who was featured in The Marketer Quarterly’s A Day in the Life of the CMO column, is just one of a number of CMO moves that have happened this year.

Marisa Thalberg stepped down from her post as CMO of Taco Bell (who was also featured in A Day in the Life of the CMO) after four years on the job where she led the company to have record-breaking sales. Continue reading

Marketer Quarterly Awards: Submit Your Best Work

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Do you have great creative and campaigns that you would like to celebrate from 2019? We are currently looking for submissions to the 2019 Marketer Quarterly Awards.

You’ll be among great company. Former winners include: Dell, Marriott, See’s Candy and Land’s End, among many many more leading and upstart brands. That glass trophy will look amazing on your desk!

Submissions will be judged by analysts from The Relevancy Group in a quantifiable scorecard driven process based on a variety of attributes including: relevance, utilization of data, creative, strategy, and results, among other category specific characteristics.

And good, news, you can submit to more than one category! Follow this link to apply. The submission deadline is 10/15/19.

MQ Issue 22: CDP Buyer’s Guide Excerpt, Jersey Mike’s CMO Featured

MQ22-COVER-092019Our 22nd issue of the Marketer Quarterly is now live!

The issue features an excerpt from The Relevancy Group’s 2019 CDP Buyer’s Guide, which profiles many of the leading CDPs in the industry.

The issue also includes A Day in the Life of Jersey Mike’s CMO Rich Hope and an interview with Chemistry’s Trevar Mazza.

Explore Land O’Lakes’ new digital video effort celebrating modern women farmers and learn how Coca-Cola and Baskin Robbins are marketing to cord cutters on Netflix.

The issue is free with registration.

Airbnb to Go Public

UnknownHome-sharing platform Airbnb will soon be open to public investment.

The popular San Francisco-based company revealed plans for its IPO to take place in 2020. The company put out a press release revealing the news as part of the required process of going public.

The company reported more than $1 billion in revenue during Q2 2018. The company has yet to report full year revenues for 2018 but reported more than $2.5 billion in revenue for 2017, a 50% increase over 2016 revenue. Earlier this year, the company privately sold common shares, valuing the hotels at around $35 billion.

Airbnb’s IPO comes as other popular unicorns have gone public in recent months including Uber and Lyft. Earlier this week, WeWork pulled back on its plans to go public.

Google’s Face Match Employs Facial Recognition

googleGoogle has introduced Face Match, a new facial recognition technology that is a part of Google Nest Hub Max.

The technology uses a front-facing camera for video calls and access to your personal data. So for instance, you can access your photos, texts and your calendar when it scans and recognizes your face.

The company said it was not a security feature and may accidentally open if a family member that looks like you scans their face or even a photo of you might work.

The company did not say how it would store the data or if it would use the information for marketing or customer profiling.

NYC Might Ban Location Data on Phones

Marketers spend billions buying location data to better target consumers on mobile devices, but a new law proposed in NYC would put an end to all of that.

The New York City Council has proposed a bill that would prohibit telecommunications carriers and mobile apps from sharing a user’s location data with another person, if the location is within New York City.

The City’s Department of Information Technology and Telecommunications would enforce the prohibition, which would be $1,000 per violation with a maximum penalty of $10,000 per day per person whose location data was shared unlawfully. This bill would prohibit anyone who receives location data from sharing it with another.

Citizens would also have the right to take action against telecommunications carriers and mobile app developers that break this law.