Digital Video Ad Spend to Rise 30%

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Digital video advertising spend is predicted to rise almost 30 percent to  $27.82 billion this year, according to new research from eMarketer.

Facebook is a leader in the video ad space, generating $6.81 billion or 24.5 percent share of all video ad spending in the U.S this year. According to the research, video ad spend makes up 30 percent of Facebook’s total revenue and the social network controls almost 87 percent of social network video ad spending in the U.S.

YouTube is expected to bring in $3.36 billion, which represents 11 percent of total U.S. digital video spend. This represents a 17.1 percent spike over last year for Google’s video giant. YouTube generates 73 percent of its ad revenues from video in the U.S.

Digital video ad spending represents about 25 percent of all U.S. digital ad spending.

 

Dunkin’ to Drop the Donuts

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Dunkin’ Brands has revealed plans to drop the word donuts from its name in January 2019.

The company announced the news on Twitter this week.

The company claims that the brand name is already synonymous with donuts and that it is therefore redundant to hold onto the word for the breakfast dessert.

The company will continue to sell donuts but will focus on its beverage business NPR has more:

In 2013, Dunkin’ Donuts began moving away from a doughnut-based identity, declaring itself a “beverage company,” when beverage sales reached 58 percent. According to the New York Times, that figure has gone up slightly to 60 percent.

We’ve been covering the brand for years. Check out our Spring 2017 issue to read more about when Dunkin’ launched their mobile app and digital ordering platform.

McDonald’s Rewards Student Pranksters

 

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McDonald’s will feature two University of Houston students in upcoming ads, after their fake ad campaign went viral.

Filipino-American students Jevh Maravilla and Christian Toledo felt that McDonald’s ads hanging in their local Pearland, TX location weren’t diverse enough, so they made their own. The two purchased a McDonald’s uniform at a thrift store, photographed themselves in the uniform, and made a poster.

With the help of friends, the kids snuck the poster into the location and hung it up on a blank wall. They then photographed themselves in front of the fake ad and it went viral. “I noticed there was a blank wall at mcdonald’s so i decided to make this fake poster of me and my friend. It’s now been 51 days since i hung it up,” Maravilla tweeted on September 2nd.

The media production student’s tweet went wild and caught the attention of Ellen DeGeneres who hosted the students on her show this week. DeGeneres surprised Maravilla and Toledo, giving them each a $25,000 check from McDonald’s and revealed that the brand plans to use them in future ads.

McDonald’s took down the poster, but plans to add more diverse posters to the store soon. The company tweeted, “You guys earned this dream.”

Marketers can learn a lot of lessons from these kids. First of all, remember to include diversity in your messaging so that all customers feel welcome when patronizing your businesses. Secondly, in the era of social media, consumers can change the conversation around your brand. In this case, the change had a sense of humor and the brand was able to capitalize on the prank. But 51 days is a long time for a DIY message to be live without a company being aware.

And who is hiring these kids? Their creativity, sense of risk and ability to point out an ad’s flaws are core skills to being a great marketer.

Issue 14 of The Marketer Quarterly is Available With Registration

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Issue 14 of The Marketer Quarterly is now live. Sign up for your free subscription.

This issue includes:
– An excerpt of TRG’s 2017 consumer marketer study
– A day in the life of Denny’s CMO
– Wells Fargo’s #GetCollegeReady Push
– Dunkin Donuts & Mobile Ordering
– Wonderful Pistachios’ Biggest Campaign to Date
– Summer Getaway Search Trends
– The Musician’s Corner
– and much much more …

Get The Marketer Quarterly online or via The Apps.

David Daniels Honored as EEC Thought Leader & Other News From Crescent City Conferences

C-17ZNzW0AAKLyMLast week The Relevancy Group and The Marketer Quarterly hit New Orleans for the Email Experience Council’s Email Evolution Conference. The sun was shining, the music was nonstop, and the email marketing brainstorming was lively.

The event kicked off with a big reveal. EEC showed its new stripes with a new logo and branding effort, a modern look reflecting the future of email.

The big news for The Relevancy Group came during the opening day luncheon. Our very own founder & CEO David Daniels was named EEC’s Thought Leader of the Year and was presented the trophy over wedge salad and rare steaks. IBM’s marketing evangelist and former award recipient Loren McDonald handed the award to David in a jovial manner, joking that David invented email, and accurately highlighting the fact that David coined the term ESP way back when. During his acceptance speech, David explained his own history with the medium: He sent his first email back in 1988 and has been emailing ever since. We’re so proud of his accomplishments and couldn’t think of a better person to hold the title.

Genevieve Longtin, director of email marketing and engagement of Sharecare, took home the Stefan Pollard Email Marketer of the Year Award. Aspen Dental won Best Makeover of an Existing Email Program. Alaska Airlines won Most Innovative use of Customer or Other Data, including Automation and Triggers. Nestle Waters North America won Best Subscriber Acquisition, Reactivation or Integration Program. Lysol Mommy Mail won Best Use of Humor, Personality, Content or Brand.

The EEC show had some compelling content. Shutterstock shared their beautiful interactive carousels inspired by children’s fashion plates. Justine Jordan’s Litmus busted some of emails biggest myths (spam words in subject lines will not land you in the spam folder). Kathryn Minshew, founder of The Muse, gave an inspiring talk on how tech has transformed the job search business. Her advice, HR needs to become employment marketers if companies want to find good candidates.

As if this wasn’t enough, Collision aka, “America’s fastest growing tech conference,” was taking place simultaneously at the New Orleans conference center next door. The event attracted leading tech companies, thought leaders and CMOs from the likes of GrubHub, WellsFargo and eBay. On stage, Suzy Deering, who is profiled in the latest issue of MQ, gave her advice: Think beyond email and know your customer.

YouTube used the show to reveal its push into the home entertainment market, and a desktop redesign with a black background (watch out Netflix). About.com rebranded to Dot Dash and has seen major increases in traffic.

You can’t go to New Orleans without digesting some music. You could find EEC and Collision goers all over town from Frenchman street to the French Quarter. A marching band even showed up at the Hilton and the entire EEC conference danced and marched along the river walk to the Steamboat Natchez where Adestra sponsored a night of good times on the Mississippi River.

The party didn’t stop at the New Orleans airport. Exhausted EEC attendees got off their feet and drank beer at the bar. My gate was decked out for Mari Gras, Dixieland jazz band, beads and all to celebrate Condor’s first direct flight between New Orleans and Europe. Passengers barely noticed the rain delays as the band played on.